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Smooth Beach

After learning about Consonant Digraphs with short vowels at the end of the SOUND OUT WORDS section (II.c), and about Diphthongs (III.c) and Vowel Teams (III.d), it is time to learn about words that combine these patterns! Words like…

SMOOTH BEACH!

Download a free set of activities that includes a worksheet, a word search, and a word sort. The words can be sorted two ways: by digraphs or by diphthongs/vowel teams. The SMOOTH BEACH freebie is available to download at the Super Tutor Tools store at Teachers Pay Teachers. Also available is a free wordlist and set of bookmarks with consonant digraphs and vowel patterns.

Play the Smooth Beach wordsearch online.

Learn more about Word Sorts and get the free set of word sort games for the Phonics Pow Toolkit.

Sweet Treats for Phonics

Use these sweet treats to teach phonics patterns in sequence!

II. SOUND OUT WORDS
a. Short Vowels | CVC words – Milk Duds
b. Blends – 100 Grand
c. Short vowels that vary – Kisses (flossy words)
III. VOWEL PATTERNS
a. Silent e – Take Five
b. Bossy R -Star Bursts
c. Diphthongs – Mounds
d. Vowel Teams – Pay Day (Oatmeal Raisin bars are good too!)
e. Vowels that vary
-Dove (Schwa sound)
-Kind bar & Hersheys Gold (i & o can be long when followed by 2 consonants)
-Milky Way (tricky y)
IV CONSONANT PATTERNS
a. Consonant Digraphs – Nestle Crunch
b. Hard or Soft C – Ice Cube gum
V. MULTI-SYLLABLE WORDS
a. Open/Closed Syllables – Zero
b. Consonant-le – Skittles
c. Schwa – Extra gum

Learn more about the Phonics Pow Toolkit, how to get free word sort games and more free resources.

Fall For Phonics: the sound of /f/

The sound of /f/ can be spelled different ways. This is one of the ways that consonants can vary. The sound of /f/ can be spelled many ways indeed, more than three! In the following sentence, how many ways do you see?

The dolphin swam fast in the rough sea by the cliff

(f as in fast, ff as in cliff, ph as in dolphin, and gh as in rough.) The word fall belongs to the special flossy word family -all, where the letter a makes the sound of a short o before double letters -ll. In the word phonics, the ph makes the sound of /f/.

WATCH the Kids vs Phonics Video (2:47) & Jack Hartmann Video (2:16)

GH can also be /g/ when you see a ghost all in white, or no sound at all when you see the light. Learn more at A ghost with a slight cough gave a great fright.

How many times do you hear the sound of /f/ in this poem about fall?

The Fall for Phonics freebie that includes the poem, a word list, and worksheet for F variations is available at the Super Tutor Tools store at Teachers Pay Teachers.

Learn more about the Phonics Pow Toolkit, how to get free word sort games and more free resources.

Be a Super Reader

This slide presentation with literary artwork shows students the power of reading. The Superman READ poster for National Library Week 1984 from the American Libraries Association: Knowledge is REAL Power!

Reading gives you power: Every book opens up a whole new world. Reading is like magic: You can travel to another dimension. Reading has the power to take you anywhere! You can explore the world, go on adventures, meet people, fly away, visit other worlds. There are many doors to open; open a book and what will you find? You might open the door to imagination, to opportunities, to freedom. You can find answers and solutions, and have access to the greatest minds. You can build a stronger brain. Go above and beyond – READ! The English language can be a nasty beast, but it is one that you can beat!

The average child ages 8-18 reads less than three hours a week…but in that same week, watches television for more than 32 hours. (see video here)  With a television, you can also go on adventures, explore, travel, meet real or imagined people, and even learn. But reading offers a special benefit – it builds a strong brain.

It is universally acknowledged that television is enjoyable, it is easily accessible and extremely consumable. Television is visually attractive and provides instant gratification, but it is passive. It is an easier choice, but it is a path that often leads nowhere.

Reading is mentally active. It is a path that leads to opportunities for education and employment. Check out this Pinterest board with links to more articles about the benefits of reading.

Credit for artwork is provided wherever it was possible, but for some I was unable to find sources. Please contact me with any information regarding credits for artwork at https://www.facebook.com/phonicspow/.

 

Chase the Sheep

After learning about Consonant Digraphs with short vowels at the end of the SOUND OUT WORDS section (II.c), and about Silent e (III.a), it is time to learn about words that have BOTH! Words like…

CHASE THE SHEEP!

This free set of activities includes a worksheet, a word search, and a word sort. The words can be sorted two ways: by digraphs or by the Bossy R vowel. The CHASE THE SHEEP freebie is available to download at the Super Tutor Tools store at Teachers Pay Teachers. Also available is a free wordlist and set of bookmarks with consonant digraphs and vowel patterns.

Play the Chase the Sheep wordsearch online.

Learn more about Word Sorts and get the free set of word sort games for the Phonics Pow Toolkit.

A Ghost with a Slight Cough Gave a Great Fright: Sounds of GH

The letters GH are enough /f/ to make you sigh (silent), aren’t they just ghastly /g/?

  1. GH sounds like /f/ when you laugh, but you must be brave…
  2. because GH sounds like /g/ in a ghoul from the grave.
  3. One more to see, and then you have three: GH might be silent in these:

When bats are in silent flight in the dark of the night, the sight can give you quite a slight fright.

These letters make no sound at all when it is bright, like a vampire that caught sight of the light.

a ghost /g/ with a slight (silent) cough /f/ gave a great fright (silent)

WATCH the Kids vs Phonics Video (1:23)

A word list and worksheet for GH variations is available at the Super Tutor Tools store at Teachers Pay Teachers.

Learn more about the Phonics Pow Toolkit, how to get free word sort games and more free resources.

The /k/ Sound at the end of words

The /k/ sound at the end of a word is one of the consonants that vary. (IV.c)

When the K sound is heard at the end of a word:

A CK is often needed after a vowel that is short. The K needs help to make it work. This is a short vowel variation that can be covered at the end of the SOUND OUT WORDS section (II.c) of the Phonics Pow Toolkit. CK is a consonant digraph (two letters that make one sound), in this case the familiar sound of /k/. Other consonant digraphs make new sounds.

The duck said “quack” on the deck near the slick dock.

PLAY a wordsearch puzzle with words that end in ck.

The rest of the time, a k often is fine.

With a consonant between it is a new task, it takes just a k so remember to ask. Drink milk, dunk a basket, or honk at an elk: the consonant means there is only a k.

In words with bossy r, and vowel teams that are long or diphthongs, a k by itself will park. (The beak of a hawk, a look at a book, a weak croak from a throat, a stork with a fork, a dog that will bark.)

Don’t panic, but there’s one more thing to see. Some two syllable words with a short i only need c. (like a picnic in the attic, it’s a little like magic.)

Learn how to get a free set of word sort games that includes words that end with the sound of /k/. A set of anchor charts, a worksheet, and a game for the /k/ sound at the beginning and end of words is available at Teachers Pay Teachers. The Consonant Variations soccer sort game includes the ending sound of /k/, plus hard or soft c and g. Learn more about spelling the K sound from thisreadingmama.

Sounds of S

The letter S the sound of /s/ makes when you see snakes. Hear the sound of /z/ when your nose smells a rose. Letter s is one of the consonants that vary.

s = /s/ at the beginning of words: sand, sell, sip, soft, sun. It is also the sound of /s/ in beginning s blends: scuff, smell, sniff, spill, stop, swim.

s at the end of words can be either /s/ or /z/: cats /s/ and dogs /z/ need baths /s/ with suds /z/. Understanding voiced or unvoiced consonants can help when s comes after a consonant. Consonants that are voiced make a vibration in the throat which can be felt. Consonants that are unvoiced are quieter and no vibration is felt.

After letters made with a hiss or puff of air, the soft sound of /s/ is often there. In these examples s follows unvoiced consonants f, t, k, p, and th: puffs, cups, cats, sacks, paths.

After letters that make the throat buzz, the sound of /z/ is often what s does. In these examples s follows voiced consonants b, d, g, v, l, m, n, r: jobs, nods, dogs, stoves, files, rooms, pens, stars.

After vowels, sometimes s = /s/

The -ss ending flossy words above have the sound of /s/.

More words with the /s/ sound after a vowel: Fill this bus with gas.

After vowels, sometimes s = /z/

Here are some words where s = /z/ after a vowel: It is easy for boys to choose toys.

When a plural -es is added to words that end with  -sh, -ch, /s/, -x, /z/, and /j/, the sound is /iz/ like in dishes, matches, classes, faces, horses, boxes, buzzes and judges.

When you sure like sugar and tissue, you hear that s can also = /sh/.

WATCH the Phonics Focus video on the sounds of s at Youtube. (5:04)

WATCH videos and PLAY online games at the Consonants That Vary tutorial at Wakelet. Some online games require flash, which is no longer supported after 12/31/2020. Learn more at The End of Flash.

Letter S is covered in Consonants that vary (IV.c) in the Phonics Pow Toolkit with a worksheet and gameboard. Learn how to get a free set of word sort games that includes the two sounds of s. A free word sort game for the letter S is available at the Super Tutor Tools store at Teachers Pay Teachers.

The /k/ Sound at the beginning of words

The /k/ sound at the beginning of words can be spelled with a c or a k. This is one of the consonants that can vary.

K takes i and e, and C takes the other three.

Some words with short vowels can begin with the /k/ sound.

Some words with more advanced vowel patterns can begin with the /k/ sound.

Introduce these words as the patterns are learned.

Available at the Super Tutor Tools store at Teachers Pay Teachers: A worksheet for the sound of /k/ at the beginning of words with anchor charts and word lists. Or the free anchor charts and word lists. A worksheet and game board are included in the Phonics Pow Toolkit. (IV.c) Learn how to get the free word sort games that include the /k/ sound.

I before E is Weird

Eight (ā) thieves (ē) tried (ī) to deceive (ē).

You may have heard this saying: i before e, except after c, and when sounding like a, as in neighbor and weigh. This is a guideline where there are quite a few exceptions: i before e, unless foreign scientist Keith leisurely seizes caffeine from feisty atheists.

Generally speaking, i before e (as in thief and tried)

except after c (as in deceive)

or when sounding like a, as in neighbor or weigh (and eight)

This is just one of the ways that vowels can vary. Practice with the I before E is Weird set of worksheets, available at the Super Tutor Tools store at Teachers Pay Teachers.